Bread Dough

2011 April 16
by azahar

UPDATED: December 27th 2013

This blog post was originally published back in April 2011, and I thought it was time for an update since the growing nefarious trend of Sevilla tapas bars charging for bread and “service” continues to grow.

It started off small a few years ago, say charging 50 cents for your typical dried-out pre-sliced vienna with a tiny package of picos. More often these days it’s become a 1 euro charge for a small basket of bread, though recently many bars have taken to charging PER PERSON for bread, which amounts to the same as a service charge.  The other day I was charged 5€ for a handful of olives, three slices of bread and a packet of picos because there were five people in my group. Scandalous.

What really irks is stopping off somewhere for a quick tapa and a beer and then finding out that I’ve been charged an extra 1.50€ for a basket of bread, especially when I hadn’t ordered bread and only nibbled on a couple of picos or used a small chunk of bread to soak up a bit of sauce, and then later I see this bread being “recycled”… ewwww.

Bar owners I’ve spoken to like to think that this is somehow a personal issue of mine and say they never hear complaints from anyone else. Well, I hear plenty of complaints from all kinds of people, including other more scrupulous bar owners. It’s not just the unpleasant surprise when you get your bill, this practice actually theatens the entire tradition of tapas bars. Imagine going on a tapeo with four or five friends, visiting several bars in an evening, something that is very common here, and at every stop you get charged an extra 4-6€ for bread or “service”. At the end of the night you’ve paid up to an extra 20-25€ or more… for nothing.

I also hear the arguments that “everyone else is doing it” and “food and drink costs a lot more in other countries”, the first argument being pathetic and the second? That’s kind of the point. Spain is not other countries. You can’t compare eating out in Sevilla to eating out in New York. At least not yet. Is that really what bar owners here want?

I have no problem when the menu clearly lists items like bread and olives and the price for each (usually 1€). I can decide if I really feel like spending extra for those items and if I order them then of course I am happy to pay. But when these items are brought to the table without being asked for, usually before you’ve had time to even look at the menu, then one naturally assumes that they are compliments of the house. In fact, bars are not allowed to charge for any items brought to the table that haven’t been ordered by the client. Likewise, they are not allowed to charge any sort of “service” charge. So if this happens to you at a bar then you are not obliged to pay.

What does this “service” charge even mean? Most visitors from the UK would assume this means it’s the tip for the waiters, which here it isn’t. The wait staff see none of this. So bars who charge for “service” are actually doing their staff a disservice as they will end up getting fewer tips. One restaurant owner recently told me that the “cubierto” charge was not only for bread but also because he uses cloth napkins which cost more than paper ones. I mean, what next? Extra charges for turning on the air-conditioning in summer? For putting toilet paper in the loos? Imagine how much extra bars could make by charging to use the toilets! Really the opportunities for getting something for nothing are endless. Seriously though, what happened to trying to offer something more or something different to attract more customers, being innovative, instead of suddenly charging for things that have always been included as part of regular service? Five years ago there were no bread or service charges in tapas bars. In my opinion people are getting too greedy and lazy.

I say that tapas bars and restaurants should factor in these fixed costs as they are clearly a part of their day-to-day operating expenses and thus should be easy to figure out. Tacking on extra charges like this just feels, well, tacky.  What do you think?

From Official Rules and Obligations for Bars, Restaurants and Cafeterias

“Los servicios no solicitados no se pueden cobrar. Tampoco se pueden cobrar conceptos como, por ejemplo, reservas, cubierto o mesa.”
“Neither unasked-for services nor such things as reservations, cover or table charges, can be charged for.”

Obligaciones de Bares, Restaurantes y Cafeterías

153 Responses leave one →
  1. April 16, 2011

    One day they will end up charging for tap water, like some do in Paris*.
    If the overall prices were just a little higher but bread was “free” it would look better. This way it looks so, so, er, “gagne-petit”. Somehow not quite the way to go to make customers feel welcome.

    * I wish it were a joke.

    • azahar permalink*
      April 16, 2011

      Somehow I find the paying for tapwater thing not hard to believe for Paris.

      Totally agree that “add ons” feel less welcoming, especially when the bread is brought to the table automatically. Same with olives.

    • December 27, 2013

      Restaurants in France are not allowed to charge for tap water (or bread, or linens, etc) if you are having a meal. If you order a coffee in a café, almost every cafe will give you a glass of water for free. (I’ve never been denied one, or asked to pay – but they do have the right to charge for it. Perhaps in very touristy parts of Paris, they get away with that but that’s certainly not normal.)

      If they do charge for tap water, the law states that there needs to be a sign posted that notes the charge. I’ve only seen that once in France, and it was 10 cents/glass, and only if you didn’t buy anything to eat or drink. (The law is here, in French.)

      • azahar permalink*
        December 27, 2013

        Thanks for that extra info, David. Being charged for water in any big city (Paris, London, NYC) wouldn’t actually surprise me, but how many people would know about the law to realise that they shouldn’t have to pay? And even then who would bother filling out a complaint form about it? I also wonder how many requests for water from non-paying customers a place would actually get to make them feel they needed to charge. Probably it’s just another way to make more money for nothing.

  2. April 16, 2011

    You should demand they price it by the nibble, to avoid paying for something you didn’t consume.

    • azahar permalink*
      April 16, 2011

      Imagine that! The worst thing is that when they bring sliced “barras” and I only eat one slice, and the rest gets put aside to be given to the next customer … who is also charged for it! Not only unhygienic but adds insult to injury.

  3. azahar permalink*
    April 16, 2011

    So THIS is interesting. A comment by Juan Tarquini left on Facebook where I linked to this blog post. Since it’s already been made public I’m sure he won’t mind me quoting him here…

    Hello everybody: Like some of you might know, I own a small place which is called Vineria San Telmo in Seville and I want to make a comment on this new entry about the charge for the bread and cutlery in restaurants. IT IS COMPLETELY ILLEGAL TO CHARGE ANYTHING EXTRA BUT THE PRICE FOR THE FOOD IN ANY RESTAURANT IN SEVILLE. I do not know the legislation in other cities, communities or countries, but here in Seville, a city in which I know the legislation, no one should be charged for nothing extra than the food, and Tax should be included in the price that we see in the menu, the “tax no included” still illegal. I am not saying that we (food & beverage industry people) should give things for free but we can always calculate the costs of cutlery and bread and add those costs to the price in the main dishes because we (customers) are still paying for those hidden costs at the end anyway. Bye!!

  4. azahar permalink*
    April 16, 2011

    Juan’s comment is a real eye-opener. I had no idea it was actually illegal to attach extra charges like this. I also really dislike it when the 8% VAT isn’t included in the price, but now that I know it’s not legal to do this I can simply refuse to pay.

    I have to say that when the menu states that bread is extra and when you order some (it isn’t just brought to the table) and you get a nice selection of freshly baked hot rolls then I don’t mind paying extra. But paying for your standard basket of bread is like being charged extra if you ask for salt or want sugar in your coffee.

  5. April 17, 2011

    Amazed to read that charging for bread is illegal in Seville. We must find out if that’s true for other parts of Spain!

    • azahar permalink*
      April 17, 2011

      Let’s go for it! Viva la Resistancia!

  6. azahar permalink*
    April 22, 2011

    At the second stop on a Sevilla Tapas Tour this evening I asked for the cheque and was appalled to see that we were charged 3.20 euros for “bread & service for 4”. What we got was a metal tin with three slices of bread (that we didn’t eat) and a handful of picos. So I marched up to the bar and asked them to please remove the bread charge. Which they did. And then I left the 3.20 euros as our tip.

  7. Weerascal permalink
    April 22, 2011

    I know that in Portugal, if you so much as touch it, you pay for it. The golden rule there (or at least when I was there) was don’t touch the bread! Or the tiny dish of carrots you get. I guess their view is, you’ve accepted it as part of your meal – despite the fact it’ll be recycled (yes, ewwww).

  8. December 28, 2013

    You could make it known that a bill for service and recycled bread = bad publicity on Twitter and your blog + no more patronage ever. Also handy would be developing an up-to-date list of all bars that charge for service just so everyone knows.

    • azahar permalink*
      December 28, 2013

      Well, it’s hard to prove “recycling”, though I’ve seen it done in many bars. Since writing this blog post almost two years ago I’ve started putting the bread/service charge on all my tapas bar and restaurant reviews, though I don’t have a separate list of those who charge.

      Again, if they want to charge for bread then that’s their right. But the price needs to be listed on the menu and it shouldn’t be brought to the table unasked for. And it should never be a PER PERSON charge. Per basket is fine. If five people order five baskets of bread at 1€ each then they know that’s the cost.

  9. Bleu permalink
    December 28, 2013

    As an owner of a small bar in Paris we have many challenges to be successful.
    Clients who sit at a table for two hours with one glass of wine and free olives do not pay the bills.
    The basic facts are people do not spend the same amount of money as they did before 2007. What used to be an average of 2 drinks a person has reduced to 1.5 drinks a person while spending the same amount of time in the bar. We have had to change our policies to stay in business.
    Currently with a charcuterie or cheese plate we serve one basket of bread cut to serve, never recycled. The first basket is free with your plate. We charge for additional baskets because people supplement bread for a free meal otherwise.
    Of course any great server or manager will comp bread, peanuts or olives if the clients have ordered several drinks.
    But, lets face it, not everyone is a great customer. We constantly get people coming into the bar and not ordering anything. Last month we had a group of 6 people. Their order was 1Pint, 1 Coke and 2 tap waters. The other two people in the group were “fine” with nothing. Should I charge for tap water? Maybe.
    As an owner I have created a space with a specific type of ambience. As a customer aren’t you obliged to pay for the experience? We would never charge a service charge per person but how can you take up a seat on a busy night and not buy anything? It happens more than you think.

    Here is the costs we have broken down.

    Peanuts, our cost 0,35€ a small plate. We offer one plate at bar. In lounge 1€.
    Olives, our cost 0,45€ a small plate. We offer one plate at bar. In lounge 1€
    Baguette, our cost 0,43€ a basket. We offer 1 basket with Charcuterie/Cheese plate. The second basket 1€
    Also remember a 7% sales tax is included in our price. Starting January 1st 8%.

    We are not trying to make a profit on these once free items but only cover our costs.
    If you have felt cheated at some of these places then I agree with Eugene. Voice your opinion on yelp, twitter, four square, or your blog. Don’t single out the city but rather the individual bar or restaurant.

    As with any restaurant or bar experience it takes word of mouth, luck and adventure to find the gems.

    • December 28, 2013

      I actually think they should ban bottled water in Paris, and have the bar and café owners put in a filtered water machine, and let them charge for it. (And since the city of Paris is promoting itself as a city going “green”, the city of Paris could give financial incentives or help restaurant/café owners buy the machines at cost.) Some restaurants are already doing this in Paris and in other cities.

      Everyone would win: There would be no unecological plastic bottles, waiters and restaurant staff would not have to carry & lift heavy cases of glass water bottles, restaurants wouldn’t need storage space (always a concern in a tight city, like Paris), restaurants could make a profit off serving water, and the world would be a better place without all those plastic bottles piling up in dumps.

      • azahar permalink*
        December 28, 2013

        That’s actually a good idea, David. Though to be honest, tap water in Sevilla is pretty good and doesn’t need extra filtering. Málaga on the other hand… you cannot drink the tap water there because it tastes vile.

        Anyhow, I do hope people realise I wasn’t singling out PARIS charging for water. That was an offhand comment to someone who lives there saying he’s been charged for water.

        In fact, I’m not talking about charging for water at all, since (so far!) that hasn’t happened in Sevilla. But hey, how would you have felt if every bar we visited in Sevilla charged us 1€ per person for “service”? At the end of an evening tapeo that tends to add up. And it’s simply not Sevilla. It’s what gastrobars want Sevilla to become. And I disagree.

    • azahar permalink*
      December 28, 2013

      Hi Bleu and welcome! Thank you for your comment. I’m afraid there may be a bit of a misunderstanding as I’m not singling out Paris at all (other than saying to someone else that I wouldn’t be surprised that they might charge for water there). I totally agree with you that not all customers are ideal. But it’s good to hear that you wouldn’t charge a service charge per person (which is my main beef here). Your prices for “extras” sound totally reasonable to me and I am sure you don’t just bring them to the client unasked for and then charge them later, as happens here.

      This blog post is about extra bread and “service” charges at tapas bars in Sevilla. Most – I’d even dare say none – of the bars that are charging this get people coming in and nursing one glass of wine for two hours. In fact some of them are the busiest places in town. With rapid turnover. Imagine what this means if they get 100 individual clients a day charging 1€ per client… that’s roughly an extra 35,000 euros a year for doing absolutely nothing. Which is of course why people here are doing it, and then using the excuse that “everyone else is doing it” to back them up. Easy money.

      Except it isn’t easy money because they do not realise that they are slowly – and maybe not so slowly – ruining their reputations. They are looking at a short term quick financial fix and not taking into consideration that people have long memories.

      “If you have felt cheated at some of these places then I agree with Eugene. Voice your opinion on yelp, twitter, four square, or your blog. Don’t single out the city but rather the individual bar or restaurant.”

      I am actually singling out Sevilla because this is where I have lived for 21 years. And this is a relatively recent trend that threatens something vital to this city – the whole culture of tapas and the tapeo. I already point out on my Sevilla Tapas blog which bars out of the 200 I have listed there have bread/service charges. And – as you suggested – I also talk about it on my blog. Here.

      Me? I never personally feel cheated because I always refuse to pay “service” charges anywhere, since it isn’t legal for bars to charge for this. But what about people who don’t know they don’t have to pay? It’s really crap after a nice meal of tapas – like I had the other day – after spending close to 50€ – to then be charged an extra 5€ for “bread/service”. Yes, most tourists will just pay and go without complaint. Heck, most locals pay and go. Because NOBODY likes to complain. But they often won’t go back. And they’ll whisper it to their friends. I’ve heard more “whispers” about this than I can count. Yet bar owners continue to believe they can just flaunt this in our faces and we’ll keep coming back.

      I don’t know what you do about people who take up space without ordering, other than to simply tell them after about 20 minutes that, if they don’t wish to order anything, you have other customers waiting for their table. Six people ordering two drinks between them is pretty naff.

      Thanks again for dropping by. Great to hear another viewpoint.

  10. August 15, 2017

    Hi blogger i see you don’t monetize your website.

    You can earn extra bucks easily, search on youtube for: how to earn selling articles

Trackbacks and Pingbacks

  1. Pan negro | lions and pancakes
  2. Bread Baskets – WTF? | azahar's sevilla blog
  3. Sevilla's Gastrobar Glut | azahar's sevilla blog
  4. Ropa Vieja Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain |
  5. Panrallao Tapas Bar in Sevilla, Spain |
  6. Taberna Poncio Tapas in Seville, Spain |
  7. Casa Belmonte Tapas Bar in Triana, Sevilla, Spain |
  8. ConTenedor Restaurant, Sevilla, Spain |
  9. Az-Zait |
  10. La Chunga |
  11. Vineria San Telmo Tapas Bar in Sevilla, Spain |
  12. Blanca Paloma Tapas, Sevilla, Spain |
  13. Cafe Bar Universal, Tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain |
  14. El Enógrafo, Wine and Tapas, Sevilla, Spain |
  15. Simún Vintage tapas bar, Sevilla, Spain |
  16. La Giganta |
  17. Taberna El Panduro Tapas Bar in Seville Spain |
  18. Mordisco Tapas |
  19. Bar Santa Ana, Tapas Bar in Triana, Sevilla, Sepain |
  20. Nantara Tapas bar in Sevilla Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  21. Cervecería Giralda | Sevilla Tapas
  22. Bodeguita Romero | Sevilla Tapas
  23. Albarama Restaurant and Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  24. Baco Restaurante Cuna 2 Seville Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  25. Sol y Sombra | Sevilla Tapas
  26. La Tasca del Pintor Triana, tapas bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  27. Lumbreras Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  28. La Brunilda tapas bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  29. Zelai | Sevilla Tapas
  30. Eslava | Sevilla Tapas
  31. Atmosfèrica Burgers & Tapas | Sevilla Tapas
  32. Don Juan de Alemanes, tapas bar/restaurant in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  33. Bar España Tapas, Egana Oriza, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  34. La Cantina Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  35. El Despacho Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  36. Las Golondrinas II | Sevilla Tapas
  37. La Azotea Tapas and Restaurant in Sevilla Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  38. Sur Bar & Tapas | Sevilla Tapas
  39. Casa Morales | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  40. Besana Tapas in Utrera Spain |
  41. Arenero Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  42. El Caserío | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  43. La Sal | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  44. Duo Tapas, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  45. Bar Europa, tapas bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  46. DeÓ tapas bar, Sevilla Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  47. Café Bar Encarnación, market tapas bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  48. Anka tapas bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  49. Luso Tapas Bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  50. Abacería José Ortega, tapas bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  51. Ajo Blanco | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  52. Las Golondrinas | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  53. The Room Arte Cuisine Tapas Bar in Sevilla Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  54. Nazca | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  55. La Cucineria Tapas Bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  56. Los Palillos, sushi fusion, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  57. Las Teresas Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  58. Bar Dueñas, tapas bar, Sevilla, Seville, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  59. Dmercao tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  60. La Pulpería tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  61. Baco Victoria Eugenia | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  62. Robles Bar Laredo | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  63. Norte Andaluza tapas bar in the Alameda, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  64. La Pepona, tapas bar, Sevilla Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  65. Uno de Uno low-cost tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  66. Pez Tomillo tapas bar and restaurant in Pedregalejo Malaga |
  67. Puratasca Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  68. Barajas 20 Tapas | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  69. Barbiana Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  70. Becerrita Restaurante and Tapas Bar in Seville Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  71. Bodega Dos de Mayo | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  72. Bodega La Mina tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  73. Bodega San Lorenzo tapas bar in Seville, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  74. Bodega Santa Cruz | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  75. Casa Antonio Bar Los Caracoles, Sevilla, Spain, | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  76. Abacería Casa Moreno, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  77. Casa Paco | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  78. Casa Paco Nervion tapas bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  79. Casa Ricardo Antigua Casa Ovidio Tapas Bar Sevilla | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  80. Casa Robles | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  81. Casablanca tapas bar and restaurant Seville Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  82. Catalina Casa de Comidas, Tapas, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  83. Cervecería Internacional Beer and Tapas, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  84. El Cairo restaurant tapas bar, Seville, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  85. El Gallinero de Sandra restaurant, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  86. El Librero Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  87. El Loco Sibarita tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  88. El Rincón de la Buhaira Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  89. El Rincon Gallego del Pulpo | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  90. El Rinconcillo | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  91. Entredos tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  92. Flores Jamones & Vinos, abacería, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  93. Ovejas Negras tapas bar, sevilla, spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  94. La Duquesita Tapas Bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  95. La Mia Tana, Italian Restaurant, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  96. Gago 6 Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  97. Room Zero Restaurant in Hotel Casa Romana, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  98. Los Coloniales | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  99. Mariscal, tapas, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  100. O'Neill's Arenal, Irish Pub in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  101. Death of the Tapeo | Open Letter to Sevilla Tapas Bar Owners | azahar in sevilla
  102. Zarabanda's Restaurante Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  103. Petit Comite tapas bar in Seville, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  104. Puerta Real tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  105. Taberna Chani tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  106. Pasos Largos Tapas Bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  107. Taberna La Tata Porvenir, Tapas Bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  108. Paco Góngora tapas bar in Sevilla, | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  109. Plato Plató tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  110. El Rincón de Murillo | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  111. Messala Tapas Bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  112. Luzanda tapas bar, Plaza Alfalfa, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  113. No Kitchen Tapas Bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  114. Casa Cuesta Zaragoza | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  115. Mamarracha tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  116. La Fabrica, Tapas, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  117. Genova Cafe Bar, Tapas, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  118. La Fabrica, Tapas, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  119. La Cocinera Feliz in Feria Market, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  120. La Tasca del Pinto Tapas Bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  121. HOB - House of Burger, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  122. La Azotea Santa Cruz, tapas bar in Sevilla Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  123. Death of the Tapeo | Open Letter to Sevilla Tapas Bar Owners |
  124. La Chalá | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  125. La Almadraba tuna bar in the Feria Market, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  126. La Cayejera Food Truck Sevilla Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  127. La Retama tapas bar in Sevilla | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  128. La Bodega Tapas Bar in Plaza Alfalfa, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  129. Bar Manolo, Tapas, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  130. Bar Alfalfa tapas in Sevilla | Sevilla Tapas Tours
  131. La Antigua Abaceria San Lorenzo tapas bar in Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  132. Nikkei Fusion Restaurant and Bar in Seville, Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  133. El Rincon tapas bar, Sevilla, Spain | Sevilla Tapas
  134. Casa Roman Tapas in Seville, Spain | Sevilla Tapas

Leave a Reply

Note: You can use basic XHTML in your comments. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS

%d bloggers like this: